bled:

more here

(Source: gofuckingsource)

ivannori:

gjmueller:

New device allows brain to bypass spinal cord, move paralyzed limbs

For the first time ever, a paralyzed man can move his fingers and hand with his own thoughts thanks to a new device. A 23-year-old quadriplegic is the first patient to use Neurobridge, an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, allowing voluntary and functional control of a paralyzed limb.

w h a t

(via mudkipmommy)

The Rio Caño Cristales - most colorful river (caused by algae and moss seen through the water), Colombia.

(Source: kelledia, via sinisteroyster)

huffpostworld:

It wouldn’t take very long for nature to reclaim much of the world that humanity’s paved over, but a mall in Thailand has far exceeded anyone’s expectations.

Closed for fifteen years, it’s now home to thousands of fish.

wow

(via spaceyacey)

sixpenceee:

sixpenceee:

Qian Hongyan was just four when she lost both her legs. A speeding trucker left her for dead as she crossed the main road in her village of Zhuangshang in southern China. 

For nearly two years Qian was immobile as she didn’t even have enough of her body left to sit up in a wheelchair. Doctors said her only hope of being able to move by herself again would be extensive surgery to allow her to be fitted with prosthetic limbs.Her parents couldn’t afford this treatment. 

Qian’s granddad Yuan came up with a simple but effective treatment to get her moving again. He took a basketball the village boys had discarded and cut a hole just big enough for tiny Qian to fit into, padded the inside with stiff floor mats from his car, then propped her up inside. All of a sudden Qian was able to stabilize herself and was able to by move herself by rolling the ball in any direction she wanted. She supported herself using wooden handles. 

From that day on Qian would not be stopped by any obstacle. She went back to school, started to play with her friends again, and started to get back the life of any girl her age. She began professional swimming training in 2007 and defied the odds of her double amputation to become one of the first members of the Yunnan Youth Swimming Club.

She won three gold medals in last year’s Yunnan Para Games and took a gold and two silver medals at the National Swimming Championship for the Disabled (Under 18) in 2009 before continuing impressively at this year’s Para Games.

SOURCE

I should have added this in the original post but after attention in the Chinese press, Qian traveled to Beijing to receive free artificial limbs at the China Rehabilitation Research Center, a center that has been providing help to the disabled in China for over 20 years. At 18 years old she is ready for her full adult prosthetics. 

(via zenec)

currentsinbiology:

Osteoporosis Drug Stops Growth of Breast Cancer Cells, Even in Resistant Tumors, Study Suggests

June 15, 2013 — A drug approved in Europe to treat osteoporosis has now been shown to stop the growth of breast cancer cells, even in cancers that have become resistant to current targeted therapies, according to a Duke Cancer Institute study.


The findings, presented June 15, 2013, at the annual Endocrine Society meeting in San Francisco, indicate that the drug bazedoxifene packs a powerful one-two punch that not only prevents estrogen from fueling breast cancer cell growth, but also flags the estrogen receptor for destruction.

"We found bazedoxifene binds to the estrogen receptor and interferes with its activity, but the surprising thing we then found was that it also degrades the receptor; it gets rid of it,” said senior author Donald McDonnell, PhD, chair of Duke’s Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology.

More at Science Daily

Image: Osteoporosis in vertebra showing 3 microfractures
Dr. Michael Klein University of Alabama, AL
Polarized light, 15x Objective

(via dragmepls)

ultrafacts:

aussietory:

third-way-is-best-way:

tuxedoandex:

kvotheunkvothe:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

EVERY TIME SOMEONE BRINGS UP THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA I GET SO ANGRY.

but why

Because it got burned. All of that knowledge, lost forever.

The library was destroyed over 1000’s of years ago. The library consisted of thousands of scrolls and books about mathematics, engineering, physiology, geography, blueprints, medicine, plays, & important scriptures. Thinkers from all over the Mediterranean used to come to Alexandria to study.Most of the major work of civilization up until that point was lost. If the library still survived till this day, society may have been more advanced and we would sure know more about the ancient world.

(via hadleydrake)

yungursaminor:

tchy:

polnitsch:

mj-the-scientist:

megacosms:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: Understanding the phenomenon of synesthesia.

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

I experience forms of this. 

I have grapheme-color synesthesia. I made a post about it, like, a year ago. Where did I put that thing? Anyway, I’m an associator. :D

I remember reading about this in horrible science when I was young. There was a guy could apparently remember everything in his life due to synesthesia. I also remember he once told someone: “What a crumbly yellow voice you have!”

No formal diagnosis but ordinal-linguistic personification represent! It’s letters, numerals, and months for me. Letters are the strongest one.

reblogging with all the crap because it has the source but oh hey, i’m actually confirmed by a doctor to have this. it’s the most frustratingly beautiful thing.

(via ecclesexual)

theenergyissue:

Kirlian Photography: Revealing Nature’s Electrical Aura 

Kirlian photography is the term used to describe the techniques used to capture the phenomenon of electrical coronal discharges. It is named after Semyon Kirlian, a Russian electrical engineer, and his wife Valentina, who in 1939 discovered that if an object on a photographic plate is connected to a high-voltage source, an image is produced on the photographic plate. They developed Kirlian photography after observing a patient in Krasnodar hospital who was receiving medical treatment from a high-frequency electrical generator. When the electrodes were brought near the patient’s skin, they noticed a glow similar to that of a Neon Discharge Tube. Afterwards, the Kirlians conducted experiments in which photographic film was placed on top of a conducting plate, and another conductor was attached to the a hand, a leaf or other plant material. The conductors were energized by a high frequency high voltage power source, producing photographic images typically showing a silhouette of the object surrounded by an aura of light. Though the Kirlians reported the results of their experiments in 1958, their work remained virtually unknown until 1970, when two Americans, Lynn Schroeder and Sheila Ostrander published a book, Psychic Discoveries Behind the Iron Curtain. While Kirlian photography has been the subject of mainstream scientific research, it has largely been co-opted by promoters of pseudoscience, parapsychology, and paranormal health claims. In many ways, the technique has effected greater mass influence because of these associations, and speaks to the ways “energy-culture” enters popular thought. 

(Source: youtube.com, via heartsinrevolt)